Lectionary Lab Live

The Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost, Year C (September 27, 2020)

For the Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost, the Bubbas review God's steadfastness despite our changeability and ponder Monty Python's famous Three Questions.

The Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Year A (September 20, 2020)

For the Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Delmer and John are holding forth on manna, working, and laborers in the vineyard subject to the whim of the master. Hmm, should be interesting! Musical accompaniment provided by Tennessee Ernie Ford with 16 Tons.

The Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Year A (September 13, 2020))

For the Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost, the Bubbas are watching Pharaoh and his soldiers trying to swim (they didn't do so well) and cogitating on the gospel. This is a strange business sometimes. Guest musicians are Netzerim performing a traditional Hebrew setting of Exodus 15, Horse and Rider

The Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Year A (September 6, 2020)

For the Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost, the Bubbas are a-talkin' texts and preaching, as per usual. Since the calendar, the clock, and our kairos are all a bit askance these days, we invited The Chicago Transit Authority by to perform Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?

The Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost, Year A (August 30, 2020)

Time to burn a little midnight oil as Moses comes to the "burning bush" to meet God! John and Delmer discuss the continuing series through Genesis and Exodus as well as important themes in Romans and the gospel of Matthew. Be sure to hang around and listen to the closer music as we proudly feature Ken Medema performing Moses.

The Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost, Year A (August 23, 2020)

For the Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost, the Bubbas turn down the heat and turn up the insight as they talk about the "little things" that mean a lot! Guest musician is Kristen Chenowith, accompanied by the Broken Arrow (OK) High School Choir, performing Upon This Rock

The Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost, Year A (August 16, 2020)

For the Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost, the Bubbas are all together on great texts from scripture, with a little mild variation on Romans. What's life without a little spice? We introduce a new musical theme for our introduction, and depart with a classic song composed by Mary Gauthier and performed by George Allan O'Dowd, Mercy Now

The Tenth Sunday after Pentecost, Year A (August 9, 2020)

For the Tenth Sunday after Pentecost, the Bubbas are opening the pages on the Joseph narrative in Genesis, and keeping up with Jesus in the gospel. Whew, it's a load! Special musical guests are ABBA performing Winner Takes It All

The Ninth Sunday after Pentecost, Year A (August 2, 2020)

For the Ninth Sunday after Pentecost, Delmer and John are "struggling" with the texts. Not really, but struggling does have something to do with it! Phil Wickham performs Face of God

The Eighth Sunday after Pentecost, Year A (July 26, 2020)

For the Eighth Sunday after Pentecost, the Bubbas are on about Jacob meeting his match and the apparent presence of God most everywhere in our lives. It's a good'un! Guest artist is Percy Sledge performing When a Man Loves a Woman

Song Notes: 

"When a Man Loves a Woman" is a song recorded by Percy Sledge in 1966 at Norala Sound Studio in Sheffield, Alabama. It made number one on both the Billboard Hot 100 and R&B singles charts. It was listed 54th in the List of Rolling Stone magazine's 500 greatest songs of all time. The sidemen for this recording included Spooner Oldham, organ; Marlin Greene, guitar; Albert "Junior" Lowe, bass and Roger Hawkins, drums. The song is credited to Calvin Lewis and Andrew Wright, who played bass and keyboards with Sledge.

However, the song was in fact written by Percy Sledge himself, but he gave it to Lewis and Wright. Before the recording session, the song had no title or lyrics. The session proceeded with the expectation that Sledge would produce them for the vocal takes. When it came time to record the vocals, Sledge improvised the lyrics with minimal pre-planning, using the melody as a guide for rhythm and phrasing. The performance was so convincing that others working on the session assumed Sledge had the lyrics written down.          -- dumpster0101 via YouTube

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